login
This site is supported by donations to The OEIS Foundation.

 

Logo


Hints
(Greetings from The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences!)
A072274 List of Ormiston prime pairs. 13
1913, 1931, 18379, 18397, 19013, 19031, 25013, 25031, 34613, 34631, 35617, 35671, 35879, 35897, 36979, 36997, 37379, 37397, 37813, 37831, 40013, 40031, 40213, 40231, 40639, 40693, 45613, 45631, 48091, 48109, 49279, 49297, 51613, 51631 (list; graph; refs; listen; history; text; internal format)
OFFSET

1,1

COMMENTS

Given the n-th prime, it is occasionally possible to form the (n+1)th prime using the same digits in a different order. Such a pair is an Ormiston Pair.

Ormiston Pairs occur rarely but randomly. It is thought that there are infinitely many but this has not been proved. They always differ by a multiple of 18. Ormiston Triples may exist but must be very large.

The smallest Ormiston triple is (11117123, 11117213, 11117321), the smallest Ormiston quadruple is (6607882123, 6607882213, 6607882231, 6607882321); see Andersen link. - Klaus Brockhaus, Jul 22 2009

The current wording of the definition suggests that the second member of Ormiston prime triples (cf. A075093) is repeated. Indeed, such a triple (p,q,r) corresponds to two pairs (a(2k-1)=p,a(2k)=q) and (a(2k+1)=q,a(2k+2)=r). (If they were listed as ...,p,q,r,...,  then the sequence would still contain both pairs as (non-disjoint) subsequences. But if that was the intended meaning, then one would prefer the title "Members of O. prime pairs" (or simply O. primes?). Under this assumption, a(n)=a(n+1) iff a(n-1)=A075093(k) (for some k) is the smallest member of an Ormiston prime triple (a(n-1), a(n)=a(n+1), a(n+2)). In particular this is the case for the first two elements of Ormiston quadruples, cf. A161160. - M. F. Hasler, Oct 11 2012

LINKS

Klaus Brockhaus, Table of n, a(n) for n = 1..7444

Andy Edwards, Ormiston Pairs, Australian Mathematics Teacher 58: 2 (2002), pp. 12-13.

Eric Weisstein's World of Mathematics, Rearrangement Prime Pair

Jens Kruse Andersen, Ormiston Tuples

FORMULA

a(2k-1)=A069567(k); a(2k)=nextprime(a(2k-1)+1). - M. F. Hasler, Oct 13 2012

EXAMPLE

Although 179 and 197 are composed of the same digits, they do not form an Ormiston Pair as several other primes intervene (i.e. 181, 191, 193.)

MATHEMATICA

a = {1}; b = {2}; Do[b = Sort[ IntegerDigits[ Prime[n]]]; If[a == b, Print[ Prime[n - 1], ", ", Prime[n]]]; a = b, {n, 1, 10^4}]

PROG

(MAGMA) &cat[ [ p, q ]: p in PrimesUpTo(52000) | (q-p) mod 18 eq 0 and a eq b where a is Sort(Intseq(p)) where b is Sort(Intseq(q)) where q is NextPrime(p) ]; // Klaus Brockhaus, Jul 22 2009

(PARI) is(n)=if(!isprime(n), return(0)); my(d=vecsort(digits(n))); vecsort(digits(precprime(n-1)))==d || vecsort(digits(nextprime(n+1)))==d \\ Charles R Greathouse IV, Mar 07 2016

CROSSREFS

Cf. A069567.

Cf. A075093 (smallest member of Ormiston prime triple), A161160 (smallest member of Ormiston prime quadruple).

Sequence in context: A238059 A186789 A229390 * A168499 A230083 A069567

Adjacent sequences:  A072271 A072272 A072273 * A072275 A072276 A072277

KEYWORD

base,nonn

AUTHOR

Andy Edwards (AndynGen(AT)aol.com), Jul 09 2002

EXTENSIONS

Edited and corrected by Robert G. Wilson v, Jul 15 2002

STATUS

approved

Lookup | Welcome | Wiki | Register | Music | Plot 2 | Demos | Index | Browse | More | WebCam
Contribute new seq. or comment | Format | Style Sheet | Transforms | Superseeker | Recent | More pages
The OEIS Community | Maintained by The OEIS Foundation Inc.

License Agreements, Terms of Use, Privacy Policy .

Last modified July 25 04:48 EDT 2017. Contains 289779 sequences.