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A369110 a(n) is the number of distinct elements appearing in the sequence formed by recursively applying A063655 when starting from n. 3
4, 3, 2, 1, 2, 2, 4, 3, 3, 5, 6, 5, 5, 4, 4, 4, 5, 4, 5, 4, 6, 6, 7, 6, 6, 5, 6, 7, 8, 7, 7, 6, 5, 6, 6, 6, 8, 7, 5, 6, 7, 6, 6, 5, 5, 7, 6, 5, 5, 5, 5, 6, 6, 5, 5, 5, 7, 8, 6, 5, 7, 6, 5, 5, 5, 6, 8, 7, 6, 6, 7, 6, 7, 6, 5, 8, 5, 6, 6, 5, 5, 7, 7, 6, 7, 6, 7, 6, 7, 6, 5, 7, 7, 6, 7, 5, 8, 7, 5 (list; graph; refs; listen; history; text; internal format)
OFFSET
1,1
COMMENTS
A063655(n) gives the smallest semiperimeter of an integral rectangle with area n, which is the same thing as the minimum sum of two positive integers whose product is n. In this sequence, A063655 is applied recursively until a cycle is found. Then the number of distinct elements appearing in this process is given as a(n). Note that it's conjectured that a cycle will be found at some point.
Conjecture: The cycle part of each sequence generated by the recursion is one of (4), (5, 6), or (6, 5). Confirmed through 1 millionth term.
The conjecture is true. Proof: The conjecture holds for n <= 6. Suppose n >= 7 and the conjecture holds for lower values of n. If n is composite, then A063655(n) <= n/2+2. If n is prime, then A063655(n) = n+1 is even and A063655(A063655(n)) <= (n+1)/2+2. In both cases, n reaches a lower number and the conjecture holds for n. - Jason Yuen, Mar 30 2024
LINKS
EXAMPLE
n = 1 can be factored as 1*1 with minimum sum 2 (similarly, A063655(1) = 2). Then 2 = 1*2, so minimum sum is 3 = A063655(2). 3 = 1*3 which means the next number in the recursion is 4 = A063655(3). 4 = 2*2 which gives the same number 4 = A063655(4), hence this recursion will create a cycle at this point. Starting from n = 1 (including 1), we generated these numbers: (1, 2, 3, 4, 4, 4, ...). Therefore, a(1) = 4. a(2), a(3), and a(4) are trivially deduced from this example.
PROG
(Python)
from sympy import divisors
def A369110(n):
c = {n}
while n<4 or n>5:
c.add(n:=(d:=divisors(n))[((l:=len(d))-1)>>1]+d[l>>1])
if n==5:
c.add(6)
return len(c) # Chai Wah Wu, Apr 25 2024
CROSSREFS
Sequence in context: A110366 A284801 A090284 * A369826 A093580 A196535
KEYWORD
nonn,easy
AUTHOR
Adnan Baysal, Jan 13 2024
STATUS
approved

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Last modified May 21 00:14 EDT 2024. Contains 372720 sequences. (Running on oeis4.)