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A123509 Rohrbach's problem: a(n) is the largest integer such that there exists a set of n integers that is a basis of order 2 for (0, 1, ..., a(n)-1). 3
1, 3, 5, 9, 13, 17, 21, 27, 33, 41, 47, 55 (list; graph; refs; listen; history; text; internal format)
OFFSET

1,2

COMMENTS

Notation: N[q] = the set of q+1 elements inside {0,1,...,N-1}

Length of the longest sequence of consecutive integers that can be obtained from a set of n distinct integers by summing any two integers in the set or doubling any one. - Jon E. Schoenfield, Jul 16 2017

According to Zhining Yang, Jul 08 2017, a(13) to a(20) are 65, 70, 79, 90, 101, 112, 123, 134, but there is some doubt about these terms, and they should be confirmed before they are accepted. They do not agree with the conjecture, so perhaps the Vba program is not correct.

REFERENCES

S. Gunturk and M. Nathanson, "A new upper bound for finite additive bases", Acta Arithmetica, Vol. 124, No. 3 (2006).

LINKS

Table of n, a(n) for n=1..12.

Kagawa, Vba program

W. D. Smith, More information

FORMULA

a(n) = A001212(n)+1 (conjecture). - R. J. Mathar, Oct 08 2006. Comment from Martin Fuller, Mar 18 2009: I agree with this conjecture. [Joerg Arndt, Aug 08 2017: should that be a(n) = A001212(n-1) + 1 for n>=2 ?]

lim inf a(n) / n^2 > 0.2857 lim sup a(n) / n^2 < 0.4789 - Charles R Greathouse IV, Aug 11 2007

EXAMPLE

Example: 8[3]: 0,1,3,4 means {0,1,2,...,8} is covered thus: 0=0+0, 1=0+1, 2=1+1, 3=0+3, 4=0+4=1+3, 5=1+4, 6=3+3, 7=3+4, 8=4+4.

N[q]: set

------------------------------

3[2]: 0,1,

4[3]: 0,1,2,

5[3]: 0,1,2,

6[3]: 0,2,3,

7[4]: 0,1,2,3,

8[4]: 0,1,3,4,

9[4]: 0,1,3,4,

10[5]: 0,1,2,4,5,

11[5]: 0,1,2,4,5,

12[5]: 0,1,3,5,6,

13[5]: 0,1,3,5,6,

14[6]: 0,1,2,4,6,7,

15[6]: 0,1,2,4,6,7,

16[6]: 0,1,3,5,7,8,

17[6]: 0,1,3,5,7,8,

18[6]: 0,2,3,7,8,10,

19[7]: 0,1,2,4,6,8,9,

20[7]: 0,1,3,5,7,9,10,

21[7]: 0,1,3,5,7,9,10,

22[7]: 0,2,3,7,8,10,11,

23[8]: 0,1,2,4,6,8,10,11,

24[8]: 0,1,3,5,7,9,11,12,

25[8]: 0,1,3,5,7,9,11,12,

26[8]: 0,2,3,7,8,10,12,13,

27[8]: 0,1,3,4,9,10,12,13,

28[8]: 0,2,3,7,8,12,13,15,

29[9]: 0,1,3,5,7,9,11,13,14,

30[9]: 0,2,3,7,8,10,12,14,15,

31[9]: 0,1,3,4,9,10,12,14,15,

32[9]: 0,2,3,7,8,12,13,15,16,

a(5)=13 because we can obtain at most a total of 13 consecutive integers from a set of 5 integers by summing any two integers in the set or doubling any one; from the 5-integer set {1,2,4,6,7}, we can obtain all 13 integers in the interval [2..14] as follows: 2=1+1, 3=1+2, 4=2+2, 5=1+4, 6=2+4, 7=1+6, 8=2+6, 9=2+7, 10=4+6, 11=4+7, 12=6+6, 13=6+7, 14=7+7.

a(16)=90 because we can obtain at most a total of 90 consecutive integers from a set of 16 integers by summing any two integers in the set or doubling any one: from the 16-integer set {1,2,4,5,8,9,10,17,18,22,25,36,47,58,69,80}, we can obtain all 90 integers in the interval [2..91]. - Jon E. Schoenfield, Jul 16 2017

CROSSREFS

Cf. A001212, A008932.

Sequence in context: A050556 A138008 A063954 * A196094 A063915 A183859

Adjacent sequences:  A123506 A123507 A123508 * A123510 A123511 A123512

KEYWORD

hard,more,nonn,changed

AUTHOR

Warren D. Smith, Oct 02 2006

EXTENSIONS

More terms (from Smith's web site) from R. J. Mathar, Oct 08 2006

Entry revised by N. J. A. Sloane, Aug 06 2017

STATUS

approved

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Last modified August 21 23:50 EDT 2017. Contains 290941 sequences.