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A085415 Take prime[n] and continue adding 1, 2, ..., a(n) until one reaches a prime. 7
1, 4, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 4, 3, 12, 3, 3, 3, 4, 3, 3, 12, 3, 3, 8, 3, 4, 3, 12, 3, 3, 3, 3, 7, 8, 4, 3, 8, 4, 12, 3, 3, 4, 3, 3, 12, 4, 3, 3, 8, 7, 7, 3, 3, 4, 3, 12, 4, 3, 3, 3, 12, 3, 3, 8, 4, 11, 3, 3, 8, 8, 3, 4, 3, 4, 3, 15, 3, 3, 4, 3, 12, 8, 11, 4, 24, 4, 8, 3, 4, 3, 15, 3, 3, 7, 8, 12, 8, 11, 4, 3, 12, 8 (list; graph; refs; listen; history; text; internal format)
OFFSET
1,2
COMMENTS
Resulting primes in A085416. See also A085417, A085418.
Prime[n] plus a triangular number is prime. - Harvey P. Dale, Jun 12 2013
LINKS
FORMULA
Prime[n]+m*(1+m)/2 is a prime for some m>0.
EXAMPLE
a(2)=4 because prime[2]+(1+2+3+4)=3+10=13 is a prime
MATHEMATICA
Flatten[(Sqrt[1+8#]-1)/2&/@With[{trnos=Accumulate[Range[30]]}, Table[ Select[ trnos, PrimeQ[Prime[n]+#]&, 1], {n, 100}]]] (* Harvey P. Dale, Jun 12 2013 *)
CROSSREFS
Sequence in context: A031350 A031353 A356764 * A187470 A059124 A320604
KEYWORD
easy,nonn
AUTHOR
Zak Seidov, Jun 29 2003
STATUS
approved

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Last modified April 16 03:06 EDT 2024. Contains 371696 sequences. (Running on oeis4.)