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A280274 a(n) = maximum value in row n of A279907. 4
0, 1, 1, 1, 1, 2, 1, 1, 1, 3, 1, 2, 1, 3, 2, 1, 1, 4, 1, 2, 2, 4, 1, 2, 1, 4, 1, 2, 1, 4, 1, 1, 3, 5, 2, 3, 1, 5, 3, 2, 1, 5, 1, 3, 2, 5, 1, 3, 1, 5, 3, 3, 1, 5, 2, 2, 3, 5, 1, 3, 1, 5, 2, 1, 2, 6, 1, 3, 3, 6, 1, 2, 1, 6, 3, 3, 2, 6, 1, 2, 1, 6, 1, 4, 2, 6, 4, 2, 1, 6, 2, 3, 4, 6, 2, 4, 1, 6, 2, 3 (list; graph; refs; listen; history; text; internal format)
OFFSET

1,6

COMMENTS

Consider integers 1 <= r <= n where all the prime divisors p of r also divide n. Call such r of n "regulars" of n, or "r regular to n".

Consider rho = smallest power e of n such that r | n^e. a(n) is the largest value of rho found among regular 1 <= r <= n of n.

For n=1, r=1 | n^0; since it is the only integer in the range 1<=k<=n and since 1 is the empty product, a(1) = 0.

a(p) = 1 for prime p, since all 1<=k<=n must either divide or be coprime to p; if k is coprime to p it is nonregular and does not qualify. Thus only k=1 and k=p divide some power of n; 1 | p^0 and p | p^1 by definition. Thus the largest value of rho among r={1,p} is 1.

a(p^x) = 1 for prime powers p^x with x >= 1, since the only regular 1<=r<=p^x are divisors that are powers {1, p^1, p^2, ... p^(x-1), p^x}; since these r are all divisors d, d | n^1 by definition, thus the largest rho among these r is 1. Thus, a(n) = 1 for n with omega(n) = 1.

a(4) = 1 since all regular 1<=r<=4 divide 4; all divisors d divide n^1 by definition, thus the largest rho among these r is 1.

a(n) > 1 for composite n>4, since there is at least one nondivisor regular ("semidivisor") 1<=r<=n. (See A243822). If r does not divide n, then it divides some power n^e with e>1, since all the prime divisors p of r divide n. Another way to look at this is that the set of prime divisors p of semidivisor r is a subset of the set of prime divisors p of n, yet r does not itself divide n. The multiplicity of at least one prime divisor p of r exceeds that of the corresponding prime divisor p of n. The maximum possible multiplicity of any number m < n pertains to the largest power of 2 < n, thus the greatest possible value of rho = floor(log2(n)).

a(n) for n = 2 (mod 4) = floor(log2(n)), since such n is an odd multiple of 2. Thus the largest power of 2^x less than n has multiplicity x for 2 while that in n is 1. Any other prime divisor q of n has multiplicity less than that of 2. Thus 2^x | n^x, and the largest rho among 1<=r<=n = x = floor(log2(n)).

a(n) for squarefree n = floor(log_p(n)) = A280363(n), where p is the smallest distinct prime divisor of n.

Consider the standard form prime decomposition of n = p_1^e_1 * p_2^3_2 * ... p_i^e_i. a(n) for all other n is the maximum value of ceiling(floor(log_p_i(n))/e_i), i.e., ceiling(A280363(n)/e_i).

a(n) < n.

a(n) is the longest terminating base-n expansion of 1/r for 1<=r<=n. Example: in base 10, the longest terminating expansion of 1/r is 3 for r = 8. 1/8 = .125. a(10) = 3.

Also maximum value in row n of A280269.

LINKS

Michael De Vlieger, Table of n, a(n) for n = 1..10000

EXAMPLE

Row n of A280269               a(n)

1:  0                          0

2:  0  1                       1

3:  0  1                       1

4:  0  1  1                    1

5:  0  1                       1

6:  0  1  1  2  1              2

7:  0  1                       1

8:  0  1  1  1                 1

9:  0  1  1                    1

10: 0  1  2  1  3  1           3

11: 0  1                       1

12: 0  1  1  1  1  2  2  1     2

13: 0  1                       1

14: 0  1  2  1  3  1           3

15: 0  1  1  2  1              2

16: 0  1  1  1  1              1

...

MATHEMATICA

Table[Function[f, Which[n == 1, 0, Length@ f == 1, 1, Max[f[[All, -1]]] == 1, Floor[Log[f[[1, 1]], n]], True, Max@ Map[With[{p = #1, e = #2}, Ceiling[Floor[Log[p, n]]/e]] & @@ # &, f]]][FactorInteger[n]], {n, 120}] (* most efficient, or *)

Table[If[PrimeNu@ n == 1, 1, Max@Map[Function[k, SelectFirst[Range[0, #], PowerMod[n, #, k] == 0 &] /. m_ /; MissingQ@ m -> Nothing], Range@ n] &@ Floor@ Log2@ n], {n, 120}] (* Version 10.2, or *)

Max@ DeleteCases[#, -1] & /@ Table[If[# == {}, -1, First@ #] &@ Select[Range[0, #], PowerMod[n, #, k] == 0 &] &@ Floor@ Log2@ n, {n, 120}, {k, n}] (* or *)

Max@ DeleteCases[#, -1] & /@ Table[Boole[k == 1] + (Boole[#[[-1, 1]] == 1] (-1 + Length@#) /. 0 -> -1) &@ NestWhileList[Function[s, {#1/s, s}]@ GCD[#1, #2] & @@ # &, {k, n}, And[First@ # != 1, ! CoprimeQ @@ #] &], {n, 120}, {k, n}]

CROSSREFS

Cf.: A162306, A279907 (T(n,k) with values for all 1 <= k <= n), A280269, A007947, A280363.

Sequence in context: A324825 A316557 A032436 * A073408 A120454 A321648

Adjacent sequences:  A280271 A280272 A280273 * A280275 A280276 A280277

KEYWORD

nonn,easy

AUTHOR

Michael De Vlieger, Dec 30 2016

STATUS

approved

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Last modified December 9 23:00 EST 2019. Contains 329880 sequences. (Running on oeis4.)