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A063048 Numbers n such that the Reverse and Add! trajectory of n (presumably) does not reach a palindrome and does not join the trajectory of any term m < n. 33
196, 879, 1997, 7059, 10553, 10563, 10577, 10583, 10585, 10638, 10663, 10668, 10697, 10715, 10728, 10735, 10746, 10748, 10783, 10785, 10787, 10788, 10877, 10883, 10963, 10965, 10969, 10977, 10983, 10985, 12797, 12898, 13097, 13197, 13694 (list; graph; refs; listen; history; text; internal format)
OFFSET
1,1
COMMENTS
The starting number n is regarded as part of the trajectory, so palindromes are excluded from the sequence. A088753 is obtained if palindromes are not excluded. The smallest term in A063048 but not in A088753 is 19098, the smallest term in A088753 but not in A063048 is 9999.
Subsequence of A023108. Sequence A070788 is similarly defined, but palindromes are irrelevant. Corresponding sequences for other bases are A075252 (base 2), A077405 (base 3), A075421 (base 4).
If the trajectory of a number k joins the trajectory of a smaller number which is a term of the present sequence, then this occurs after very few Reverse and Add! steps (at most 8 for k < 100000, at most 10 for k < 1000000). On the other hand, the trajectories of the terms < 14000 do not join the trajectory of any smaller term within at least 1500 steps. This is the precise meaning of "presumably" in the definition.
The terms are rather unevenly distributed. They form clusters, especially above 10^4, 10^5, 10^6, ... . The interval from 10000 to 11000 for example contains 26 terms, whereas only two terms occur in the interval from 90000 to 100000.
It seems that if the most significant digit is not equal to 1, the least significant digit is always 9, while this does not hold for the Lychrel numbers as in A023108. - A.H.M. Smeets, Feb 18 2019
From A.H.M. Smeets, Sep 18 2021: (Start)
Let d_0 d_1 d_2 ... d_n be the decimal digits of an (n+1)-digit number.
All numbers in this sequence seem to satisfy the following condition:
d_0 = "1" or d_n = "9", and for all k, 0 < k < floor((n-1)/2), d_k = "0" or d_k = "9" or d_(n-k) = "0" or d_(n-k) = "9".
The plot log_10(a(n)) versus log_10(n) shows a stepwise behavior. However, the global behavior seems to be a straight line with slope e/(e-1) (= A185393). This slope is also obtained for the seeds in the Reverse and Add! problem in other bases. (End)
REFERENCES
Daniel Lignon, Dictionnaire de (presque) tous les nombres entiers, Ellipses, Paris, 2012, 702 pages. See Entry 196.
LINKS
A.H.M. Smeets, Table of n, a(n) for n = 1..21491 (terms 1..1711 from Klaus Brockhaus).
EXAMPLE
1997 is a term since the trajectory of 1997 (presumably) does not lead to a number which occurs in the trajectory of 196 or of 879 (actually checked for the first 10000 terms of these trajectories). The trajectory of 1997 joins the trajectory of 106 at 97768 (cf. A070796), but 106 is not a term of the present sequence.
MATHEMATICA
limit = 10^3; (* Assumes that there is no palindrome if none is found before "limit" iterations *)
utraj = {};
Select[Range[0, 14000], (x = NestWhileList[ # + IntegerReverse[#] &, #, ! PalindromeQ[#] &, 1, limit];
If[Length[x] >= limit && Intersection[x, utraj] == {},
utraj = Union[utraj, x]; True,
utraj = Union[utraj, x]]) &] (* Robert Price, Oct 16 2019 *)
CROSSREFS
Sequence in context: A211851 A089493 A088753 * A306232 A006960 A014798
KEYWORD
base,nonn
AUTHOR
Klaus Brockhaus, Jul 07 2001, revised Nov 04 2003
STATUS
approved

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Last modified July 25 04:49 EDT 2024. Contains 374586 sequences. (Running on oeis4.)