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A246716 Positive numbers that are not the product of (exactly) two distinct primes. 3
1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8, 9, 11, 12, 13, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 23, 24, 25, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 36, 37, 40, 41, 42, 43, 44, 45, 47, 48, 49, 50, 52, 53, 54, 56, 59, 60, 61, 63, 64, 66, 67, 68, 70, 71, 72, 73, 75, 76, 78, 79, 80, 81, 83, 84, 88, 89, 90, 92, 96, 97, 98, 99, 100 (list; graph; refs; listen; history; text; internal format)
OFFSET

1,2

COMMENTS

Non-disjoint union of A100959 and A000961. Disjoint union of A100959 and A001248.

Complement of A006881, then inheriting the "opposite" of the properties of A006881.

a(n+1) - a(n) <= 4 (gap upper bound) - (that is because among four consecutive integers there is always a multiple of 4, then there is a number which is not the product of two distinct primes). E.g., a(26)-a(25) = a(62)-a(61) = 4. Is it true that for any k <= 4 there is an infinite number of n verifing: a(n+1) - a(n) = k ?

If r = A006881(n+1) - A006881(n) - 1 > 1, it indicates that there are r terms of (a(j)) starting with j = A006881(n) - n + 1 which are consecutive integers. E.g., A006881(8) - A006881(7) - 1 = 6, so there are 6 consecutive terms in (a(j)), starting with j = A006881(7) - 7 + 1 = 20.

LINKS

Giuseppe Coppoletta, Table of n, a(n) for n = 1..10000

EXAMPLE

7 is in the sequence because 7 is prime, so it has only one prime divisor.

8 and 9 are in the sequence because neither of them has two distinct prime divisors.

30 is in the sequence because it is the product of three primes.

On the other hand, 35 is not in the sequence because it is the product of two distinct primes.

MAPLE

filter:= n -> map(t -> t[2], ifactors(n)[2]) <> [1, 1]:

select(filter, [$1..1000]); # Robert Israel, Nov 02 2014

MATHEMATICA

Select[Range[125], Not[PrimeOmega[#] == PrimeNu[#] == 2] &] (* Alonso del Arte, Nov 03 2014 *)

PROG

(PARI) isok(n) = (omega(n)!=2) || (bigomega(n) != 2); \\ Michel Marcus, Nov 01 2014

(MAGMA) [n: n in [1..100] | #PrimeDivisors(n) ne 2 or &*[t[2]: t in Factorization(n)] ne 1]; // Bruno Berselli, Nov 12 2014

(Sage) def A246716_list(n) :

    R = []

    for i in (1..n) :

        d = prime_divisors(i)

        if len(d) <> 2 or d[0]*d[1] <> i : R.append(i)

    return R

A246716_list(100)

(Sage) [n for n in (1..100) if sloane.A001221(n)<>2 or sloane.A001222(n)<>2] # Giuseppe Coppoletta, Jan 19 2015

CROSSREFS

Cf. A001358, A100959, A006881, A007774, A001221, A001222, A007304, A000977, A001248, A000961.

Sequence in context: A196736 A284946 A285901 * A212165 A130091 A119848

Adjacent sequences:  A246713 A246714 A246715 * A246717 A246718 A246719

KEYWORD

nonn,easy

AUTHOR

Giuseppe Coppoletta, Nov 01 2014

STATUS

approved

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Last modified December 13 14:58 EST 2017. Contains 295958 sequences.