login
The OEIS Foundation is supported by donations from users of the OEIS and by a grant from the Simons Foundation.

 

Logo


Hints
(Greetings from The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences!)
A212279 A002144(n+1)^2+1 mod A002144(n), where A002144 are the Pythagorean primes (p=4k+1). 0
0, 0, 0, 28, 17, 39, 4, 72, 79, 65, 17, 65, 17, 29, 145, 65, 84, 65, 145, 17, 109, 17, 65, 0, 145, 65, 17, 145, 88, 17, 64, 145, 17, 28, 257, 65, 17, 65, 145, 145, 257, 65, 17, 269, 145, 401, 257, 145, 65, 257, 65, 145, 17, 577, 145, 65, 145, 17, 577, 65, 577 (list; graph; refs; listen; history; text; internal format)
OFFSET

1,4

COMMENTS

Motivated by the fact that the first terms are zero (which is of course a coincidence). Other values (17, 65, 145, 257...) occur much more frequently.

Conjecture: a(n) = A082073(n)^2 + 1 for all n > 159. - Charles R Greathouse IV, May 13 2012

LINKS

Table of n, a(n) for n=1..61.

K. Rose, Law of small numbers, primenumbers group, May 2012.

EXAMPLE

5^2+1 = 2*13, 13^2+1 = 10*17, 17^2=10*29; therefore a(1)=a(2)=a(3)=0.

29^2+1 = 22*37+28, therefore a(4)=28.

Kermit Rose's post in the primenumbers Yahoo group:

  >>> (5**2+1)%13

  0

  >>> (13**2+1)%17

  0

  >>> (17**2+1)%29

  0

  Looks remarkable.

  >>> (29**2+1)%37

  28.

  Oops: Break in the pattern. Another illustration of the law of small numbers. :)

PROG

(PARI) o=5; forprime(p=o+1, 900, p%4==1|next; print1((o^2+1)%o=p", "))

CROSSREFS

Sequence in context: A033970 A033348 A040759 * A040758 A196031 A196028

Adjacent sequences:  A212276 A212277 A212278 * A212280 A212281 A212282

KEYWORD

nonn

AUTHOR

M. F. Hasler, May 13 2012

STATUS

approved

Lookup | Welcome | Wiki | Register | Music | Plot 2 | Demos | Index | Browse | More | WebCam
Contribute new seq. or comment | Format | Style Sheet | Transforms | Superseeker | Recent
The OEIS Community | Maintained by The OEIS Foundation Inc.

License Agreements, Terms of Use, Privacy Policy. .

Last modified October 28 21:20 EDT 2020. Contains 338064 sequences. (Running on oeis4.)