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A189722 Number of self-avoiding walks of length n on square lattice such that at each point the angle turns 90 degrees (the first turn is assumed to be to the left - otherwise the number must be doubled). 0

%I

%S 1,2,3,5,8,13,21,34,55,89,141,226,362,580,921,1468,2344,3740,5922,

%T 9413,14978,23829,37686,59770,94882,150606,237947,376784,597063,

%U 946086,1493497,2361970,3737699,5914635,9330438,14741315,23301716,36833270,58071568

%N Number of self-avoiding walks of length n on square lattice such that at each point the angle turns 90 degrees (the first turn is assumed to be to the left - otherwise the number must be doubled).

%C The number of snakes composed of n identical segments such that the snake starts with a left turn and the other (n-2) joints are bent at 90-degree angles, either to the left or to the right, in such a way that the snake does not overlap.

%C Vi Hart came up with this idea of snakes (see the link below).

%H Vi Hart, <a href="http://vihart.com/blog/how-to-snakes/">How To Snakes</a> [Broken link?]

%H Vi Hart, <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Gx5D09s5X6U">How to snakes</a>, YouTube, March 2011.

%H IBM Corp., <a href="http://domino.research.ibm.com/Comm/wwwr_ponder.nsf/Challenges/April2011.html">Ponder This</a>, April 2011.

%e For n=2 the a(2)=1 there is only one snake:

%e (0,0), (0,1), (-1,1).

%e For n=3 the a(3)=2 there are two snakes:

%e (0,0), (0,1), (-1,1), (-1,0);

%e (0,0), (0,1), (-1,1), (-1,2).

%e Representing the walk (or snake) as a sequence of turns I and -I in the complex plane, with the initial condition that the first turn is I, for length 2 we have [I], for length 3 we have [I,I], [I,-I], and for length 4 we have [I,I,-I], [I,-I,I], [I,-I,-I].

%p ValidSnake:=proc(P) local S, visited, lastdir, lastpoint, j;

%p S:={0, 1}; lastdir:=1; lastpoint:=1;

%p for j from 1 to nops(P) do lastdir:=lastdir*P[j];

%p lastpoint:=lastpoint+lastdir;

%p S:=S union {lastpoint};

%p od;

%p if (nops(S) = (2+nops(P))) then return(true); else return(false); fi;

%p end;

%p NextList:=proc(L) local S, snake, newsnake;

%p S:={ };

%p for snake in L do

%p newsnake:=[op(snake), I];

%p if ValidSnake(newsnake) then S:=S union {newsnake}; fi;

%p newsnake:=[op(snake), -I];

%p if ValidSnake(newsnake) then S:=S union {newsnake}; fi;

%p od;

%p return(S union { });

%p end;

%p L:={[I]}:

%p for k from 3 to 25 do

%p L:=NextList(L):

%p print(k, nops(L));

%p od:

%p # second Maple program:

%p a:= proc(n) local v, b;

%p v:= proc() true end: v(0, 0), v(0, 1):= false$2:

%p b:= proc(n, x, y, d) local c;

%p if v(x, y) then v(x, y):= false;

%p c:= `if`(n=0, 1,

%p `if`(d=1, b(n-1, x, y+1, 2) +b(n-1, x, y-1, 2),

%p b(n-1, x+1, y, 1) +b(n-1, x-1, y, 1) ));

%p v(x, y):= true; c

%p else 0 fi

%p end;

%p b(n-2, -1, 1, 1)

%p end:

%p seq(a(n), n=2..25); # _Alois P. Heinz_, Jun 10 2011

%t a[n_] := Module[{v, b}, v[_, _] = True; v[0, 0] = v[0, 1] = False; b[m_, x_, y_, d_] := Module[{c}, If[v[x, y], v[x, y] = False; c = If[m == 0, 1, If[d == 1, b[m-1, x, y+1, 2] + b[m-1, x, y-1, 2], b[m-1, x+1, y, 1] + b[m-1, x-1, y, 1]]]; v[x, y] = True; c, 0]]; b[n-2, -1, 1, 1]]; Table[ a[n], {n, 2, 25}] (* _Jean-Fran├žois Alcover_, Nov 07 2015, after _Alois P. Heinz_ *)

%K nonn,walk

%O 2,2

%A _Dan Dima_ and _Stephen C. Locke_, Apr 25-26 2011

%E a(33)-a(40) from _Alois P. Heinz_, Jun 10 2011

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Last modified December 7 13:07 EST 2016. Contains 278875 sequences.