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A168425 Large Associated Ramanujan Prime, p_i. 10
3, 13, 19, 31, 43, 53, 61, 71, 73, 101, 103, 109, 131, 151, 157, 173, 181, 191, 229, 233, 239, 241, 251, 269, 271, 283, 311, 313, 349, 353, 373, 379, 409, 419, 421, 433, 439, 443, 463, 491, 499, 509, 571, 577, 593, 599, 601, 607, 613, 643, 647, 653, 659, 661 (list; graph; refs; listen; history; text; internal format)
OFFSET

1,1

COMMENTS

a(n) is the smallest prime on the right side of the Ramanujan Prime Corollary, 2*p_(i-n) > p_i, for i > k where k = pi(p_k) = pi(R_n) That is, p_k is the n-th Ramanujan Prime, R_n and the k-th prime.

a(n) = nextprime(R_n) = nextprime(p_k), where nextprime(x) is the next prime larger than x.

This is very useful in showing the number of primes in the range [p_k, 2*p_(i-n)] is greater than or equal to 1. By taking into account the size of the gaps between primes in [p_(i-n),p_k], one can see that the average prime gap is about log(p_k) using the following R_n / (2*n) ~ log(R_n).

Proof of Corollary: See Wikipedia link.

The number of primes until the next Ramanujan prime, R_(n+1), can be found in A190874.

Srinivasan's Lemma (2014): p_(k-n) < (p_k)/2 if R_n = p_k and n > 1. Proof: By the minimality of R_n, the interval ((p_k)/2,p_k] contains exactly n primes, so p_(k-n) < (p_k)/2. - Jonathan Sondow, May 10 2014

In spite of the name Large Associated Ramanujan Prime, a(n) is not a Ramanujan prime for many values of n. - Jonathan Sondow, May 10 2014

LINKS

T. D. Noe, Table of n, a(n) for n = 1..1000

S. Ramanujan, A proof of Bertrand's postulate, J. Indian Math. Soc., 11 (1919), 181-182.

V. Shevelev, Ramanujan and Labos primes, their generalizations and classifications of primes

J. Sondow, Ramanujan primes and Bertrand's postulate, Amer. Math. Monthly 116 (2009) 630-635.

J. Sondow, J. W. Nicholson, and T. D. Noe, Ramanujan Primes: Bounds, Runs, Twins, and Gaps, J. Integer Seq. 14 (2011) Article 11.6.2

J. Sondow, Ramanujan Prime in MathWorld

Anitha Srinivasan, An upper bound for Ramanujan primes, Integers, 19 (2014), #A19

Wikipedia , Ramanujan Prime

FORMULA

a(n) = prime(primepi(A104272(n)) + 1)

EXAMPLE

For n=10, the n-th Ramanujan prime is A104272(n)= 97, the value of k = 25, so i is >= 26, i-n >= 16, the i-n prime is 53, and 2*53 = 106. This leaves the range [97, 106] for the 26th prime which is 101. In this example, 101 is the large associated Ramanujan prime.

PROG

(Perl) use ntheory ":all"; say next_prime(nth_ramanujan_prime($_)) for 1..100; # Dana Jacobsen, Dec 25 2015

CROSSREFS

Cf. A104272, A168421, A179196, A190874.

Cf. A202187, A202188, A234298.

Sequence in context: A260802 A045435 A038974 * A252090 A079419 A117300

Adjacent sequences:  A168422 A168423 A168424 * A168426 A168427 A168428

KEYWORD

nonn

AUTHOR

John W. Nicholson, Nov 25 2009

STATUS

approved

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Last modified December 10 11:58 EST 2016. Contains 279001 sequences.