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A167814 Number of admissible basis in the postage stamp problem for n denominations and h = 7 stamps. 6
1, 7, 105, 3407, 217997, 24929035, 4863045067 (list; graph; refs; listen; history; text; internal format)
OFFSET

1,2

COMMENTS

A basis 1 = b_1 < b_2 ... < b_n is admissible if all the values 1 <= x <= b_n is obtainable as a sum of at most h (not necessarily distinct) numbers in the basis.

REFERENCES

R. K. Guy, Unsolved Problems in Number Theory, C12.

LINKS

Table of n, a(n) for n=1..7.

R. Alter and J. A. Barnett, A postage stamp problem, Amer. Math. Monthly, 87 (1980), 206-210.

M. F. Challis, Two new techniques for computing extremal h-bases A_k, Comp J 36(2) (1993) 117-126

Erich Friedman, Postage stamp problem

W. F. Lunnon, A postage stamp problem, Comput. J. 12 (1969) 377-380.

S. Mossige, Algorithms for Computing the h-Range of the Postage Stamp Problem, Math. Comp. 36 (1981) 575-582

CROSSREFS

Other enumerations with different parameters: A167809 (h = 2), A167810 (h = 3), A167811 (h = 4), A167812 (h = 5), A167813 (h = 6), A167814 (h = 7).

For h = 2, cf. A008932.

Sequence in context: A238464 A096131 A049210 * A209545 A002486 A203971

Adjacent sequences:  A167811 A167812 A167813 * A167815 A167816 A167817

KEYWORD

hard,more,nonn

AUTHOR

Yogy Namara (yogy.namara(AT)gmail.com), Nov 12 2009

STATUS

approved

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Last modified December 6 09:18 EST 2016. Contains 278775 sequences.