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A158235 Numbers n whose square can be represented as a repdigit number in some base less than n. 7
11, 20, 39, 40, 49, 78, 133, 247, 494, 543, 1086, 1218, 1629, 1651, 1729, 2172, 2289, 2715, 3097, 3258, 3458, 3801, 4171, 4344, 4503, 4578, 4887, 5187, 5430, 6194, 6231, 6867, 6916, 7303, 7540, 7563, 8342, 8645, 8773, 9139, 9156, 9291, 10374, 12103 (list; graph; refs; listen; history; text; internal format)
OFFSET

1,1

COMMENTS

Alternatively, numbers n such that n^2 = d*(b^k-1)/(b-1) for some b, d, and k with d < b < n. See Inkeri link.

It appears that 11^2 and 20^2 are the only squares representable as repunits having more than two "digits" in some base (see A208242).

Some bases, such as 313, appear many times. Why? See A158236 for the bases and A158237 for the repdigit.

Can a square have more than one representation? The representations of 11^2, 20^2, 40^2, and 1218^2 have more than 3 "digits". Is the list of such numbers finite?

A generalization of this problem, to "determine all perfect powers with identical digits in some basis", is briefly mentioned on page 6 of Waldschmidt's paper. - T. D. Noe, Mar 30 2009

From Bernard Schott, Aug 25 2017: (Start)

Some bases, such as 313, appear 10 times; others, such as 653, appear 9 times.

The reason is that for these bases b, we have 111_b = a * c^2 with a/b ~ 1/100. So for k such that 1 <= k <= floor(b/a)^(1/2), we can write: (a*k^2, a*k^2, a*k^2)_b = (k*a*c)^2. For instance,

111_313 = 3*181^2 and (3*k^2, 3*k^2, 3*k^2)_313 = (3*k*181)^2 = (543*k)^2, for k = 1 to 10.

111_653 = 7*247^2 and (7*k^2, 7*k^2, 7*k^2)_653 = (7*k*247)^2 = (1729*k)^2, for k = 1 to 9. (End)

Each term of this sequence except 11 has a square which can also be represented as a repdigit in some base greater than n, so they are also Brazilian repdigits with only two digits. - Bernard Schott, Aug 25 2017

LINKS

Michael De Vlieger and Michel Marcus, Table of n, a(n) for n = 1..100 (first 75 terms from Michel Marcus).

K. Inkeri, On the diophantine equation a * (x^n - 1) / (x-1) = y^m, Acta Arithmetica, XXI (1972).

Michel Waldschmidt, Open Diophantine problems, arXiv:math/0312440 [math.NT], 2003-2004.

Michael De Vlieger, Table of Values of OEIS A158235(n), A158236(n), and A158237(n) for 1 <= n <= 100.

EXAMPLE

11^2 = 11111 in base 3.

20^2 = 1111 in base 7.

39^2 = 333 in base 22.

40^2 = 4444 in base 7.

49^2 = 777 in base 18.

78^2 = (12)(12)(12) in base 22.

1218^2 = (21)(21)(21)(21) in base 41.

MATHEMATICA

Do[sq = n^2; Do[If[Length[Union[IntegerDigits[sq, b]]] == 1, Print[{n, sq, b, IntegerDigits[sq, b]}]], {b, 2, n}], {n, 10000}]

PROG

(PARI) isok(n) = {for (b=2, n-1, if (#Set(digits(n^2, b)) == 1, return (1)); ); return (0); } \\ Michel Marcus, Sep 06 2017

CROSSREFS

Cf. A158245 (primitive terms), A158912 (four-digit repdigit numbers).

Cf. A158236 (the bases), A158237 (the repdigit).

Sequence in context: A160843 A153368 A068600 * A158245 A076851 A164576

Adjacent sequences:  A158232 A158233 A158234 * A158236 A158237 A158238

KEYWORD

nice,nonn

AUTHOR

T. D. Noe, Mar 14 2009

EXTENSIONS

Inequality edited by T. D. Noe, Mar 30 2009

STATUS

approved

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Last modified November 18 02:54 EST 2017. Contains 294840 sequences.