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A086436 Maximum number of parts possible in a factorization of n. 6
1, 1, 1, 2, 1, 2, 1, 3, 2, 2, 1, 3, 1, 2, 2, 4, 1, 3, 1, 3, 2, 2, 1, 4, 2, 2, 3, 3, 1, 3, 1, 5, 2, 2, 2, 4, 1, 2, 2, 4, 1, 3, 1, 3, 3, 2, 1, 5, 2, 3, 2, 3, 1, 4, 2, 4, 2, 2, 1, 4, 1, 2, 3, 6, 2, 3, 1, 3, 2, 3, 1, 5, 1, 2, 3, 3, 2, 3, 1, 5, 4, 2, 1, 4, 2, 2, 2, 4, 1, 4, 2, 3, 2, 2, 2, 6, 1, 3, 3, 4, 1, 3 (list; graph; refs; listen; history; text; internal format)
OFFSET

1,4

LINKS

Table of n, a(n) for n=1..102.

Eric Weisstein's World of Mathematics, Unordered Factorization

EXAMPLE

a(6)=2 since 6 may be factored as {{2,3},{6}}, so the largest number of factors possible is 2 {2,3}.

a(8)=3 since 8 may be factored as {{8},{2,2,2},{2,4}}, so the largest numbers of factors possible is 3 {2,2,2}.

a(30)=3 since 30 may be factored as {{30},{2,3,5},{5,6},{3,10},{2,15}}, so the largest numbers of factors possible is 3 {2,3,5}.

MATHEMATICA

Join[{1}, PrimeOmega[Range[2, 110]]] (* Harvey P. Dale, Jun 20 2013 *)

PROG

(Mupad) numlib::Omega (n)$ n=1..102 // Zerinvary Lajos, May 13 2008

CROSSREFS

Essentially the same as A001222.

Sequence in context: A116479 A122810 A179953 * A001222 A098893 A069248

Adjacent sequences:  A086433 A086434 A086435 * A086437 A086438 A086439

KEYWORD

nonn

AUTHOR

Eric W. Weisstein, Jul 19 2003

STATUS

approved

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Last modified September 2 10:51 EDT 2014. Contains 246353 sequences.