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A006055 Primes with consecutive (ascending) digits.
(Formerly M0679)
21
2, 3, 5, 7, 23, 67, 89, 4567, 78901, 678901, 23456789, 45678901, 9012345678901, 789012345678901, 56789012345678901234567890123, 90123456789012345678901234567, 678901234567890123456789012345678901 (list; graph; refs; listen; history; text; internal format)
OFFSET

1,1

REFERENCES

J. S. Madachy, Consecutive-digit primes - again, J. Rec. Math., 5 (No. 4, 1972), 253-254.

Thomas E. Moore, A Note on the Distribution of Primes in Arithmetic Progressions, J. Rec. Math., 5 (1972), 253-254.

R. C. Schroeppel, personal communication, 1991.

N. J. A. Sloane and Simon Plouffe, The Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences, Academic Press, 1995 (includes this sequence).

D. Zwillinger, Consecutive-Digit Primes - In Different Bases, J. Rec. Math., 10 (1972), 32-33.

LINKS

Paul Tek, Table of n, a(n) for n = 1..36

Eric Weisstein's World of Mathematics, Prime Number.

MATHEMATICA

f[n_] := Block[{u = Range@n, t = Table[1, {n}]}, Select[ Drop[ Union@ Flatten@ Table[ FromDigits[ Mod[u + i*t, 10]], {i, 10}], 2], PrimeQ@# &]]; Array[f, 35] // Flatten (* Robert G. Wilson v, Jul 05 2006 *)

CROSSREFS

Cf. A052016, A052017, A048398, A120804, A120805.

Sequence in context: A056041 A083017 A006510 * A052017 A277575 A289754

Adjacent sequences:  A006052 A006053 A006054 * A006056 A006057 A006058

KEYWORD

nonn,base

AUTHOR

N. J. A. Sloane, Richard Schroeppel

EXTENSIONS

a(17) from Robert G. Wilson v, Jul 05 2006

Entry revised by N. J. A. Sloane, Feb 07 2007

STATUS

approved

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Last modified July 20 20:57 EDT 2017. Contains 289629 sequences.