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A002620 Quarter-squares: floor(n/2)*ceiling(n/2). Equivalently, floor(n^2/4).
(Formerly M0998 N0374)
261
0, 0, 1, 2, 4, 6, 9, 12, 16, 20, 25, 30, 36, 42, 49, 56, 64, 72, 81, 90, 100, 110, 121, 132, 144, 156, 169, 182, 196, 210, 225, 240, 256, 272, 289, 306, 324, 342, 361, 380, 400, 420, 441, 462, 484, 506, 529, 552, 576, 600, 625, 650, 676, 702, 729, 756, 784, 812 (list; graph; refs; listen; history; text; internal format)
OFFSET

0,4

COMMENTS

b(n) = A002620(n+2) = number of multigraphs with loops on 2 nodes with n edges [so g.f. for b(n) is 1/((1-x)^2*(1-x^2))]. Also number of 2-covers of an n-set; also number of 2 X n binary matrices with no zero columns up to row and column permutation. - Vladeta Jovovic, Jun 08 2000

a(n) is also the maximal number of edges that a triangle-free graph of n vertices can have. For n = 2m, the maximum is achieved by the bipartite graph K(m, m); for n = 2m + 1, the maximum is achieved by the bipartite graph K(m, m + 1). - Avi Peretz (njk(AT)netvision.net.il), Mar 18 2001

a(n) is the number of arithmetic progressions of 3 terms and any mean which can be extracted from the set of the first n natural numbers (starting from 1). - Santi Spadaro, Jul 13 2001

This is also the order dimension of the (strong) Bruhat order on the Coxeter group A_{n-1} (the symmetric group S_n). - Nathan Reading (reading(AT)math.umn.edu), Mar 07 2002

Let M_n denote the n X n matrix m(i,j) = 2 if i = j; m(i, j) = 1 if (i+j) is even; m(i, j) = 0 if i + j is odd, then a(n+2) = det M_n. - Benoit Cloitre, Jun 19 2002

Sums of pairs of neighboring terms are triangular numbers in increasing order. - Amarnath Murthy, Aug 19 2002

Also, from the starting position in standard chess, minimum number of captures by pawns of the same color to place n of them on the same file (column). Beyond a(6), the board and number of pieces available for capture are assumed to be extended enough to accomplish this task. - Rick L. Shepherd, Sep 17 2002

For example, a(2) = 1 and one capture can produce "doubled pawns", a(3) = 2 and two captures is sufficient to produce tripled pawns, etc. (Of course other, uncounted, non-capturing pawn moves are also necessary from the starting position in order to put three or more pawns on a given file.) - Rick L. Shepherd, Sep 17 2002

Terms are the geometric mean and arithmetic mean of their neighbors alternately. - Amarnath Murthy, Oct 17 2002

Maximum product of two integers whose sum is n. - Matthew Vandermast, Mar 04 2003

a(n+1) gives number of non-symmetric partitions of n into at most 3 parts, with zeros used as padding. E.g., a(6) = 12 because we can write 5 = 5 + 0 + 0 = 0 + 5 + 0 = 4 + 1 + 0 = 1 + 4 + 0 = 1 + 0 + 4 = 3 + 2 + 0 = 2 + 3 + 0 = 2 + 0 + 3 = 2 + 2 + 1 = 2 + 1 + 2 = 3 + 1 + 1 = 1 + 3 + 1. - Jon Perry, Jul 08 2003

a(n-1) gives number of distinct elements greater than 1 of non-symmetric partitions of n into at most 3 parts, with zeros used as padding, appear in the middle. E.g., 5 = 5 + 0 + 0 = 0 + 5 + 0 = 4 + 1 + 0 = 1 + 4 + 0 = 1 + 0 + 4 = 3 + 2 + 0 = 2 + 3 + 0 = 2 + 0 + 3 = 2 + 2 + 1 = 2 + 1 + 2 = 3 + 1 + 1 = 1 + 3 + 1. Of these, 050, 140, 320, 230, 221, 131 qualify and a(4) = 6. - Jon Perry, Jul 08 2003

Union of square numbers (A000290) and oblong numbers (A002378). - Lekraj Beedassy, Oct 02 2003

Conjectured size of the smallest critical set in a Latin square of order n (true for n <= 8). - Richard Bean (rwb(AT)eskimo.com), Jun 12 2003 and Nov 18 2003

a(n) gives number of maximal strokes on complete graph K_n, when edges on K_n can be assigned directions in any way. A "stroke" is a locally maximal directed path on a directed graph. Examples: n = 3, two strokes can exist, "x -> y -> z" and " x -> z", so a(3) = 2 . n = 4, four maximal strokes exist, "u -> x -> z" and "u -> y" and "u -> z" and "x -> y -> z", so a(4) = 4. - Yasutoshi Kohmoto (zbi74583(AT)boat.zero.ad.jp), Dec 20 2003

Number of symmetric Dyck paths of semilength n+1 and having three peaks. E.g., a(4) = 4 because we have U*DUUU*DDDU*D, UU*DUU*DDU*DD, UU*DDU*DUU*DD and UUU*DU*DU*DDD, where U = (1, 1), D = (1, -1) and * indicates a peak. - Emeric Deutsch, Jan 12 2004

Number of valid inequalities of the form j + k < n + 1, where j and k are positive integers, j <= k, n >= 0. Partial sums of A004526 (nonnegative integers repeated: partitions into two parts). - Rick L. Shepherd, Feb 27 2004

See A092186 for another application.

Also, the number of nonisomorphic transversal combinatorial geometries of rank 2. - Alexandr S. Radionov (rasmailru(AT)mail.ru), Jun 02 2004

a(n+1) is the transform of n under the Riordan array (1/(1-x^2), x). - Paul Barry, Apr 16 2005

a(n) = A108561(n+1,n-2) for n > 2. - Reinhard Zumkeller, Jun 10 2005

1, 2, 4, 6, 9, 12, 16, 20, 25, 30, ... specifies the largest number of copies of any of the gifts you receive on the n-th day in the "Twelve Days of Christmas" song. For example, on the fifth day of Christmas, you have 9 French hens. - Alonso del Arte, Jun 17 2005

a(n) = Sum(Min{k, n-k}: 0 <= k <= n), sums of rows of the triangle in A004197. - Reinhard Zumkeller, Jul 27 2005

a(n+1) is the number of noncongruent integer-sided triangles with largest side n. - David W. Wilson [Comment corrected Sep 26 2006]

A quarter-square table can be used to multiply integers since n*m = a(n+m) - a(n-m) for all integer n, m. - Michael Somos, Oct 29 2006

The sequence is the size of the smallest strong critical set in a Latin square of order n. - G.H.J. van Rees (vanrees(AT)cs.umanitoba.ca), Feb 16 2007

Maximal number of squares (maximal area) in a polyomino with perimeter 2n. - Tanya Khovanova, Jul 04 2007

For n >= 3 a(n-1) is the number of bracelets with n+3 beads, 2 of which are red, 1 of which is blue. - Washington Bomfim, Jul 26 2008

Equals row sums of triangle A122196. - Gary W. Adamson, Nov 29 2008

a(n+1) = a(n) + A110654(n). - Reinhard Zumkeller, Aug 06 2009

a(n) = (n*n - 2*n + n mod 2)/4. - Ctibor O. Zizka, Nov 23 2009

Also a(n-1) = C(((n+(n mod 2))/2), 2) + C(((n-(n mod 2))/2), 2), so this is the second diagonal of A061857 and A061866, and each even-indexed term is the average of its two neighbors. - Antti Karttunen

Equals triangle A171608 * ( 1, 2, 3, ...). - Gary W. Adamson, Dec 12 2009

a(n) gives the number of nonisomorphic faithful representations of the Symmetric group S_3 of dimension n. Any faithful representation of S_3 must contain at least one copy of the 2-dimensional irrep, along with any combination of the two 1-dimensional irreps. - Andrew Rupinski, Jan 20 2011

a(n+2) counts the number of ways to make change for "c" cents, letting n = floor(c/5) to account for the 5-repetitive nature of the task, using only pennies, nickels and dimes (see A187243). - Adam Sasson, Mar 07 2011

a(n) belongs to the sequence if and only if a(n) = floor(sqrt(a(n))) * ceiling(sqrt(a(n))), that is, a(n) = k^2 or a(n) = k*(k+1), k >= 0. - Daniel Forgues, Apr 17 2011

a(n) is the sum of the positive integers < n that have the opposite parity as n.

Deleting the first 0 from the sequence results in a sequence b = 0, 1, 2, 4, ... such that b(n) is sum of the positive integers <= n that have the same parity as n. The sequence b(n) is the additive counterpart of the double factorial. - Peter Luschny, Jul 06 2011

Third outer diagonal of Losanitsch's Triangle, A034851. - Fred Daniel Kline, Sep 10 2011

Written as a(1) = 1, a(n) = a(n-1) + ceiling (a(n-1)) this is to ceiling as A002984 is to floor, and as A033638 is to round. - Jonathan Vos Post, Oct 08 2011

a(n-2) counts the number of distinct graphs with n vertices and n regions. - Erik Hasse, Oct 18 2011

Construct the n-th row of Pascal's triangle (A007318) from the preceding row, starting with row 0 = 1. a(n) counts the total number of additions required to compute the triangle in this way up to row n, with the restrictions that copying a term does not count as an addition, and that all additions not required by the symmetry of Pascal's triangle are replaced by copying terms. - Douglas Latimer, Mar 05 2012

a(n) is the sum of the positive differences of the parts in the partitions of n+1 into exactly 2 parts. - Wesley Ivan Hurt, Jan 27 2013

a(n) is the maximum number of covering relations possible in an n-element graded poset. For n = 2m, this bound is achieved for the poset with two sets of m elements, with each point in the "upper" set covering each point in the "lower" set. For n = 2m+1, this bound is achieved by the poset with m nodes in an upper set covering each of m+1 nodes in a lower set. - Ben Branman, Mar 26 2013

a(n+2) is the number of (integer) partitions of n into 2 sorts of 1's and 1 sort of 2's. - Joerg Arndt, May 17 2013

Alternative statement of Oppermann's conjecture: For n>2, there is at least one prime between a(n) and a(n+1). - Ivan N. Ianakiev, May 23 2013. [This conjecture was mentioned in A220492, A222030. - Omar E. Pol, Oct 25 2013]

For any given prime number, p, there are an infinite number of a(n) divisible by p, with those a(n) occurring in evenly spaced clusters of three as a(n), a(n+1), a(n+2) for a given p. The divisibility of all a(n) by p and the result are given by the following equations, where m >= 1 is the cluster number for that p: a(2m*p)/p = p*m^2 - m; a(2m*p + 1)/p = p*m^2; a(2m*p + 2)/p = p*m^2 + m. The number of a(n) instances between clusters is 2*p - 3. - Richard R. Forberg, Jun 09 2013

Apart from the initial term this is the elliptic troublemaker sequence R_n(1,2) in the notation of Stange (see Table 1, p.16). For other elliptic troublemaker sequences R_n(a,b) see the cross references below. - Peter Bala, Aug 08 2013

a(n) is also the total number of twin hearts patterns (6c4c) packing into (n+1) X (n+1) coins, the coins left is A042948 and the voids left is A000982. See illustration in links. -Kival Ngaokrajang, Oct 24 2013

Partitions of 2n into parts of size 1, 2 or 4 where the largest part is 4, i.e., A073463(n,2). - Henry Bottomley, Oct 28 2013

a(n+1) is the minimum length of a sequence (of not necessarily distinct terms) that guarantees the existence of a (not necessarily consecutive) subsequence of length n in which like terms appear consecutively. This is also the minimum cardinality of an ordered set S that ensures that, given any partition of S, there will be a subset T of S so that the induced subpartition on T avoids the pattern ac/b, where a < b < c. - Eric Gottlieb, Mar 05 2014

A237347(a(n)) = 3; A235711(n) = A003415(a(n)). - Reinhard Zumkeller, Mar 18 2014

Also the number of elements of the list 1..n+1 such that for any two elements {x,y} the integer (x+y)/2 lies in the range ]x,y[. - Robert G. Wilson v, May 22 2014

A240025(a(n) = 1. -- Reinhard Zumkeller, Jul 05 2014

REFERENCES

G. L. Alexanderson et al., The William Powell Putnam Mathematical Competition - Problems and Solutions: 1965-1984, M.A.A., 1985; see Problem A-1 of 27-th Competition.

T. M. Apostol, Introduction to Analytic Number Theory, Springer-Verlag, 1976, page 73, problem 25.

R. L. Graham, D. E. Knuth and O. Patashnik, Concrete Mathematics. Addison-Wesley, Reading, MA, 1990, p. 99.

D. E. Knuth, The art of programming, Vol. 1, 3rd Edition, Addison-Wesley, 1997, Ex. 36 of section 1.2.4.

J. Nelder, Critical sets in Latin squares, CSIRO Division of Math. and Stats. Newsletter, Vol. 38 (1977), p. 4.

N. Reading, Order Dimension, Strong Bruhat Order and Lattice Properties for Posets, Order, Vol. 19, no. 1 (2002), 73-100.

N. J. A. Sloane, A Handbook of Integer Sequences, Academic Press, 1973 (includes this sequence).

N. J. A. Sloane and Simon Plouffe, The Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences, Academic Press, 1995 (includes this sequence).

LINKS

Franklin T. Adams-Watters, Table of n, a(n) for n = 0..10000

J. A. Bate & G. H. J. van Rees, The Size of the Smallest Strong Critical Set in a Latin Square, Ars Combinatoria, Vol. 53 (1999) 73-83.

Washington G. Bomfim, Illustration of the bracelets with 8 beads, 2 of which are red, 1 of which is blue..

H. Bottomley, Illustration of initial terms

J. Brandts and C. Cihangir, Counting triangles that share their vertices with the unit n-cube, in Conference Applications of Mathematics 2013 in honor of the 70th birthday of Karel Segeth. Jan Brandts, Sergey Korotov, et al., eds., Institute of Mathematics AS CR, Prague 2013.

P. J. Cameron, BCC Problem List, Problem BCC15.15 (DM285), Discrete Math. 167/168 (1997), 605-615.

P. J. Cameron, Sequences realized by oligomorphic permutation groups, J. Integ. Seqs. Vol. 3 (2000), #00.1.5.

E. Fix and J. L. Hodges, Jr., Significance probabilities of the Wilcoxon test, Annals Math. Stat., 26 (1955), 301-312.

A. Ganesan, Automorphism groups of graphs, arXiv preprint arXiv:1206.6279, 2012. - From N. J. A. Sloane, Dec 17 2012

INRIA Algorithms Project, Encyclopedia of Combinatorial Structures 105

O. A. Ivanov, On the number of regions into which n straight lines divide the plane, Amer. Math. Monthly, 117 (2010), 881-888. See Th. 4.

T. Jenkyns and E. Muller, Triangular triples from ceilings to floors, Amer. Math. Monthly, 107 (Aug. 2000), 634-639.

V. Jovovic, Vladeta Jovovic, Number of binary matrices

Clark Kimberling and John E. Brown, Partial Complements and Transposable Dispersions, J. Integer Seqs., Vol. 7, 2004.

S. Lafortune, A. Ramani, B. Grammaticos, Y. Ohta and K.M. Tamizhmani, Blending two discrete integrability criteria: ...

S. M. Losanitsch, Die Isomerie-Arten bei den Homologen der Paraffin-Reihe, Chem. Ber. 30 (1897), 1917-1926.

Mircea Merca, Inequalities and Identities Involving Sums of Integer Functions, J. Integer Sequences, Vol. 14 (2011), Article 11.9.1.

Kival Ngaokrajang, Illustration of twin hearts patterns (6c4c): T, U, V

Brian OSullivan and Thomas Busch, Spontaneous emission in ultra-cold spin-polarised anisotropic Fermi seas, arXiv 0810.0231v1 [quant-ph], 2008. [Eq 8a, lambda=2]

Simon Plouffe, Approximations de séries génératrices et quelques conjectures, Dissertation, Université du Québec à Montréal, 1992.

Simon Plouffe, 1031 Generating Functions and Conjectures, Université du Québec à Montréal, 1992.

N. Reading, Order Dimension, Strong Bruhat Order and Lattice Properties for Posets

J. Scholes, 27th Putnam 1966 Prob.A1

N. J. A. Sloane, Classic Sequences

Sam E. Speed, The Integer Sequence A002620 and Upper Antagonistic Functions, Journal of Integer Sequences, Vol. 6 (2003), Article 03.1.4

K. E. Stange, Integral points on elliptic curves and explicit valuations of division polynomials arXiv:1108.3051v3 [math.NT]

Thomas Wieder, The number of certain k-combinations of an n-set, Applied Mathematics Electronic Notes, vol. 8 (2008).

Index entries for two-way infinite sequences

Index to sequences with linear recurrences with constant coefficients, signature (2,0,-2,1).

FORMULA

a(n) = (2*n^2-1+(-1)^(n))/8. - Paul Barry, May 27 2003

G.f.: x^2/((1-x)^2*(1-x^2)).

E.g.f.: exp(x)*(2*x^2+2*x-1)/8+exp(-x)/8.

a(n) = 2*a(n-1) - 2*a(n-3) + a(n-4). - Jaume Oliver Lafont, Dec 05 2008

a(-n) = a(n).

a(n) = a(n-1) + int(n/2), n > 0. - Adam Kertesz (adamkertesz(AT)worldnet.att.net), Sep 20 2000

a(n) = a(n-1) + a(n-2) - a(n-3) + 1 [with a(-1) = a(0) = a(1) = 0], a(2k) = k^2, a(2k-1) = k(k-1). - Henry Bottomley, Mar 08 2000

0*0, 0*1, 1*1, 1*2, 2*2, 2*3, 3*3, 3*4, ... with an obvious pattern.

a(n) = sum(floor(k/2), k = 1..n). - Yong Kong (ykong(AT)curagen.com), Mar 10 2001

a(n) = n*floor((n - 1)/2) - (floor((n - 1)/2)*(floor((n - 1)/2)+ 1)); a(n) = a(n-2) + n - 2 with a(1) = 0, a(2) = 0. - Santi Spadaro, Jul 13 2001

Also: a(n) = C(n, 2) - a(n-1) = A000217(n-1) - a(n-1) with a(0) = 0. - Labos Elemer, Apr 26 2003

a(n) = sum{k = 0..n, (-1)^(n-k)*C(k, 2) }. - Paul Barry, Jul 01 2003

a(n) = (-1)^n * partial sum of alternating triangular numbers. - Jon Perry, Dec 30 2003

a(n) = A024206(n+1) - n. - Philippe Deléham, Feb 27 2004

Partial sums of A004526. - Lekraj Beedassy, Jun 30 2004

a(n) = a(n-2) + n - 1, n>1. - Paul Barry, Jul 14 2004

a(n+1) = sum min(i, n-i), i = 0..n. - Marc LeBrun, Feb 15 2005

a(n+1) = sum{k = 0..floor((n-1)/2), n - 2k}; a(n+1) = sum{k = 0..n, k*(1-(-1)^(n+k-1))/2}. - Paul Barry, Apr 16 2005

1 + 1/(1 + 2/(1 + 4/(1 + 6/(1 + 9/(1 + 12/(1 + 16/(1 + . . ))))))) = 6/(Pi^2 - 6) = 1.550546096730... - Philippe Deléham, Jun 20 2005

For n > 2 a(n) = a(n-1) + ceiling(sqrt(a(n-1))). - Jonathan Vos Post, Jan 19 2006

Sequence starting (2, 2, 4, 6, 9,...) = A128174 (as an finite lower triangular matrix) * vector [1, 2, 3,...]; where A128174 = (1; 0,1; 1,0,1; 0,1,0,1;...). - Gary W. Adamson, Jul 27 2007

a(n) = sum(i = k..n, P(i, k) ) where P(i, k) is the number of partitions of i into k parts. - Thomas Wieder, Sep 01 2007

a(n) = sum of row (n-2) of triangle A115514. - Gary W. Adamson, Oct 25 2007

For n > 1: gcd(a(n+1), a(n)) = a(n+1) - a(n). - Reinhard Zumkeller, Apr 06 2008

a(n+3) = a(n) + A000027(n) + A008619(n+1) = a(n) + A001651 (n+1) with a(1)=0, a(2), a(3)=1. - Yosu Yurramendi, Aug 10 2008

a(2n) = A000290(n). a(2n+1)=A002378(n). - Gary W. Adamson, Nov 29 2008

a(n) = SUM((k mod 2)*(n-k): 0 <= k <= n), cf. A000035, A001477. - Reinhard Zumkeller, Nov 05 2009

a(n) = round((2*n^2-1)/8) = round(n^2/4) = ceil((n^2-1)/4). - Mircea Merca, Nov 29 2010

n*a(n+2) = 2*a(n+1) + (n+2)*a(n). Holonomic Ansatz with smallest order of recurrence. - Thotsaporn Thanatipanonda, Dec 12 2010

a(n) = (n (2 + n) + n mod 2)/4. - Fred Daniel Kline, Sep 11 2011

a(n) = A199332(n, floor((n+1)/2)). - Reinhard Zumkeller, Nov 23 2011

G.f.: G(0)*x^2/(2*(1-x^2)*(1-x)), where G(k)= 1 + 1/(1 - x*(2*k+1)/(x*(2*k+2) + 1/G(k+1))); (continued fraction). - Sergei N. Gladkovskii, May 25 2013

a(n) = floor(b(n)) with b(n) = b(n-1) + n/(1+e^(1/n)) and b(0)= 0. - Richard R. Forberg, Jun 08 2013

a(n) = sum_{i = 1..floor((n+1)/2)} (n+1-2i). - Wesley Ivan Hurt, Jun 09 2013

a(n) = floor((n+2)/2 - 1) * floor((n+2)/2) - 1 + ((n+2) mod 2)). - Wesley Ivan Hurt, Jun 09 2013

sum(n>=2, 1/a(n) ) = 1 + Zeta(2) = 1+A013661. - Enrique Pérez Herrero, Jun 30 2013

Empirical: a(n) = floor(n/(e^(4/n)-1). - Richard R. Forberg, Jul 24 2013

G.f.: Q(0)*x^2/(1-x) , where Q(k) = 1 + x/( 1 - x*(k+2)/( x*(k+2) + (k+1)/Q(k+1) )); (continued fraction). - Sergei N. Gladkovskii, Aug 19 2013

a(n) = A007590(n)/2. - Wesley Ivan Hurt, Mar 08 2014

EXAMPLE

a(3) = 2, floor(3/2)*ceiling(3/2) = 2.

[ n] a(n)

---------

[ 2] 1

[ 3] 2

[ 4] 1 + 3

[ 5] 2 + 4

[ 6] 1 + 3 + 5

[ 7] 2 + 4 + 6

[ 8] 1 + 3 + 5 + 7

[ 9] 2 + 4 + 6 + 8

MAPLE

A002620 := n->floor(n^2/4); G002620 := series(x^2/((1-x)^2*(1-x^2)), x, 60);

with(combstruct):ZL:=[st, {st=Prod(left, right), left=Set(U, card=r), right=Set(U, card<r), U=Sequence(Z, card>=1)}, unlabeled]: subs(r=1, stack): seq(count(subs(r=2, ZL), size=m), m=0..57) ; # Zerinvary Lajos, Mar 09 2007

A002620:=-1/(z+1)/(z-1)^3; # Simon Plouffe in his 1992 dissertation, leading zeros dropped

A002620 := n -> add(k, k = select(k -> k mod 2 <> n mod 2, [$1 .. n])): seq(A002620(n), n = 0 .. 57);

# Peter Luschny, Jul 06 2011

MATHEMATICA

f[n_] := Ceiling[n/2]Floor[n/2]; Table[ f[n], {n, 0, 56}] (* Robert G. Wilson v, Jun 18 2005 *)

a = 0; Table[(a = n^2 + n - a)/2, {n, -1, 90}] (* Vladimir Joseph Stephan Orlovsky, Nov 18 2009 *)

a[n_] := a[n] = 2a[n - 1] - 2a[n - 3] + a[n - 4]; a[0] = a[1] = 0; a[2] = 1; a[3] = 2; Array[a, 60, 0] (* Robert G. Wilson v, Mar 28 2011 *)

LinearRecurrence[{2, 0, -2, 1}, {0, 0, 1, 2}, 60] (* Harvey P. Dale, Oct 05 2012 *)

f[n_] := Block[{c = 0, m = n+1}, Do[ If[ MemberQ[ Range[x, y], (x + y)/2], c++ ], {x, m - 1}, {y, x + 1, m}]; c] - Robert G. Wilson v, May 22 2014

PROG

(MAGMA) [ Floor(n/2)*Ceiling(n/2) : n in [0..40]];

(PARI) a(n)=n^2\4

(PARI) t(n)=n*(n+1)/2 for(i=1, 50, print1(", "(-1)^i*sum(k=1, i, (-1)^k*t(k))))

(PARI) a(n)=n^2>>2 \\ Charles R Greathouse IV, Nov 11 2009

(Haskell)

a002620 = (`div` 4) . (^ 2) -- Reinhard Zumkeller, Feb 24 2012

(Maxima) makelist(floor(n^2/4), n, 0, 50); /* Martin Ettl, Oct 17 2012 */

CROSSREFS

A087811 is another version of this sequence.

Cf. A024206, A072280, A002984, A007590, A000212, A118015, A056827, A118013, A128174, A000601, A115514, A189151, A063657, A171608, A007590, A005044, A030179. First differences give integers repeated (cf. A008619 or A004526).

Differences of A002623. Complement of A049068.

a(n) = A014616(n-2) + 2 = A033638(n) - 1 = A078126(n) + 1. Cf. A055802, A055803.

Antidiagonal sums of array A003983.

Cf. A033436 - A033444. - Reinhard Zumkeller, Nov 30 2009

Cf. A008233, A008217, A014980, A197081, A197122.

Elliptic troublemaker sequences: A000212 (= R_n(1,3) = R_n(2,3)), A007590 (= R_n(2,4)), A030511 (= R_n(2,6) = R_n(4,6))), A033436 (= R_n(1,4) = R_n(3,4)), A033437 (= R_n(1,5) = R_n(4,5)), A033438 (= R_n(1,6) = R_n(5,6)), A033439 (= R_n(1,7) = R_n(6,7)), A184535 (= R_n(2,5) = R_n(3,5)).

Sequence in context: A088900 A083392 A076921 * A087811 A025699 A224813

Adjacent sequences:  A002617 A002618 A002619 * A002621 A002622 A002623

KEYWORD

nonn,easy,nice,core,changed

AUTHOR

N. J. A. Sloane

STATUS

approved

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Last modified October 24 08:24 EDT 2014. Contains 248502 sequences.